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Vuln: QEMU L2 Table Size Validation Integer Overf... SecurityFocus Vulns
QEMU L2 Table Size Validation Integer Overflow Vulnerability
Vuln: QEMU CVE-2014-3689 Multiple Local Security ... SecurityFocus Vulns
QEMU CVE-2014-3689 Multiple Local Security Bypass Vulnerabilities
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QEMU 'hw/usb/bus.c' Heap Based Buffer Overflow Vulnerability
TA14-323A: Microsoft Windows Kerberos KDC Remote ... US-CERT
Original release date: November 19, 2014

Systems Affected

  • Microsoft Windows Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1
  • Microsoft Server 2003, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2, Server 2012, and Server 2012 R2

Overview

A remote escalation of privilege vulnerability exists in implementations of Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) in Microsoft Windows which could allow a remote attacker to take control of a vulnerable system. [1]

Description

The Microsoft Windows Kerberos KDC fails to properly check service tickets for valid signatures, which can allow aspects of the service ticket to be forged. The improper check allows an attacker to escalate valid domain user account privileges to those of a domain administrator account, which renders the entire domain vulnerable to compromise.

At the time this release was issued, Microsoft was aware of limited, targeted attacks attempting to exploit this vulnerability.

Impact

A valid domain user can pass invalid domain administrator credentials, gain access and compromise any system on the domain, including the domain controller. [2]

Solution

An update is available from Microsoft. Please see Microsoft Security Bulletin MS14-068 and Microsoft Research Security and Defense Blog for more details, and apply the necessary updates.[1, 3

References

Revision History

  • November 19, 2014: Initial Draft

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA14-318B: Microsoft Windows OLE Automation Array... US-CERT
Original release date: November 14, 2014

Systems Affected

  • Microsoft Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, RT, and RT 8.1
  • Microsoft Server 2003, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2, Server 2012, and Server 2012 R2

Overview

A vulnerability in Microsoft Windows Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially-crafted web page in Internet Explorer.[1]

Description

The Microsoft Windows OLE OleAut32.dll library provides the SafeArrayRedim function that allows resizing of SAFEARRAY objects in memory.[2] In certain circumstances, this library does not properly check sizes of arrays when an error occurs. The improper size allows an attacker to manipulate memory in a way that can bypass the Internet Explorer Enhanced Protected Mode (EPM) sandbox as well as the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET).

This vulnerability can be exploited using a specially-crafted web page utilizing VBscript in Internet Explorer. However, it may impact other software that makes use of OleAut32.dll and VBscript.

Exploit code is publicly available for this vulnerability. Additional details may be found in CERT/CC Vulnerability Note VU#158647.

Impact

Arbitrary code can be run on the computer with user privileges. If the user is an administrator, the attacker may run arbitrary code as an administrator, fully compromising the system. 

Solution

An update is available from Microsoft.[3] Please see Microsoft Security Bulletin MS14-064 for more details and mitigation guidance, and apply the necessary updates.

References

Revision History

  • November 14, 2014: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA14-318A: Microsoft Secure Channel (Schannel) Vu... US-CERT
Original release date: November 14, 2014

Systems Affected

  • Microsoft Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, RT, and RT 8.1
  • Microsoft Server 2003, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2, Server 2012, and Server 2012 R2

Microsoft Windows XP and 2000 may also be affected.

Overview

A critical vulnerability in Microsoft Windows systems could allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code via specially crafted network traffic.[1]

Description

Microsoft Secure Channel (Schannel) is a security package that provides SSL and TLS on Microsoft Windows platforms.[2, 3] Due to a flaw in Schannel, a remote attacker could execute arbitrary code on both client and server applications.[1]

It may be possible for exploitation to occur without authentication and via unsolicited network traffic. According to Microsoft MS14-066, there are no known mitigations or workarounds.[2]

Microsoft patches are typically reverse-engineered and exploits developed in a matter of days or weeks.[4] An anonymous Pastebin user has threatened to publish an exploit on Friday, November 14, 2014.[5]

Impact

This flaw allows a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code and fully compromise vulnerable systems.[6]

Solution

Microsoft has released Security Bulletin MS14-066 to address this vulnerability in supported operating systems.[2]

References

Revision History

  • November 14, 2014: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA14-317A: Apple iOS "Masque Attack" Technique US-CERT
Original release date: November 13, 2014 | Last revised: November 17, 2014

Systems Affected

iOS devices running iOS 7.1.1, 7.1.2, 8.0, 8.1, and 8.1.1 beta.

Overview

A technique labeled “Masque Attack” allows an attacker to substitute malware for a legitimate iOS app under a limited set of circumstances.

Description

Masque Attack was described by FireEye mobile security researchers [1], Stefan Esser of SektionEins, and Jonathan Zdziarski. This attack works by luring users to install an app from a source other than the iOS App Store or their organizations’ provisioning system. In order for the attack to succeed, a user must install an untrusted app, such as one delivered through a phishing link.  

This technique takes advantage of a security weakness that allows an untrusted app—with the same “bundle identifier” as that of a legitimate app—to replace the legitimate app on an affected device, while keeping all of the user’s data. This vulnerability exists because iOS does not enforce matching certificates for apps with the same bundle identifier. Apple’s own iOS platform apps, such as Mobile Safari, are not vulnerable.

Impact

An app installed on an iOS device using this technique may:

  • Mimic the original app’s login interface to steal the victim’s login credentials.
  • Access sensitive data from local data caches.
  • Perform background monitoring of the user’s device.
  • Gain root privileges to the iOS device.
  • Be indistinguishable from a genuine app.

Solution

iOS users can protect themselves from Masque Attacks by following three steps:

  1. Don’t install apps from sources other than Apple’s official App Store or your own organization.
  2. Don’t click “Install” from a third-party pop-up when viewing a web page.
  3. When opening an app, if iOS shows an “Untrusted App Developer” alert, click on “Don’t Trust” and uninstall the app immediately.

Further details on Masque Attack and mitigation guidance can be found on FireEye’s blog [1]. US-CERT does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.

References

Revision History

  • November 13, 2014: Initial Release
  • November 17, 2014: Vulnerability attribution amended

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA14-310A: Microsoft Ending Support for Windows S... US-CERT
Original release date: November 10, 2014

Systems Affected

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 operating system

Overview

Microsoft is ending support for the Windows Server 2003 operating system on July 14, 2015.[1] After this date, this product will no longer receive:

  • Security patches that help protect PCs from harmful viruses, spyware, and other malicious software
  • Assisted technical support from Microsoft
  • Software and content updates

Description

All software products have a lifecycle. End of support refers to the date when Microsoft will no longer provide automatic fixes, updates, or online technical assistance.[2] As of July 2014, there were 12 million physical servers worldwide still running Windows Server 2003.[3]

Impact

Computer systems running unsupported software are exposed to an elevated risk to cybersecurity dangers, such as malicious attacks or electronic data loss.

Users may also encounter problems with software and hardware compatibility since new software applications and hardware devices may not be built for Windows Server 2003.

Organizations that are governed by regulatory obligations may find they are no longer able to satisfy compliance requirements while running Windows Server 2003.

Solution

Computers running the Windows Server 2003 operating system will continue to work after support ends. However, using unsupported software may increase the risks of viruses and other security threats. Negative consequences could include loss of confidentiality, integrity, and or availability of data, system resources and business assets.

The Microsoft "Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy FAQ" page offers additional details.[2]

Users have the option to upgrade to a currently supported operating system or other cloud-based services. There are software vendors and service providers in the marketplace who offer assistance in migrating from Windows Server 2003 to a currently supported operating system or SaaS (software as a service) / IaaS (infrastructure as a service) products and services.[4,5] US-CERT does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.

References

Revision History

  • November 10, 2014: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA14-300A: Phishing Campaign Linked with “Dyre... US-CERT
Original release date: October 27, 2014 | Last revised: October 28, 2014

Systems Affected

Microsoft Windows

Overview

Since mid-October 2014, a phishing campaign has targeted a wide variety of recipients while employing the Dyre/Dyreza banking malware. Elements of this phishing campaign vary from target to target including senders, attachments, exploits, themes, and payload(s).[1][2] Although this campaign uses various tactics, the actor’s intent is to entice recipients into opening attachments and downloading malware.

Description

The Dyre banking malware specifically targets sensitive user account credentials. The malware has the ability to capture user login information and send the captured data to malicious actors.[3] Phishing emails used in this campaign often contain a weaponized PDF attachment which attempts to exploit vulnerabilities found in unpatched versions of Adobe Reader.[4][5] After successful exploitation, a user's system will download Dyre banking malware. All of the major anti-virus vendors have successfully detected this malware prior to the release of this alert.[6]

Please note, the below listing of indicators does not represent all characteristics and indicators for this campaign.

Phishing Email Characteristics:

  • Subject: "Unpaid invoic" (Spelling errors in the subject line are a characteristic of this campaign)
  • Attachment: Invoice621785.pdf

System Level Indicators (upon successful exploitation):

  • Copies itself under C:\Windows\[RandomName].exe
  • Created a Service named "Google Update Service" by setting the following registry keys:
    • HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\googleupdate\ImagePath: "C:\WINDOWS\pfdOSwYjERDHrdV.exe"
    • HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\googleupdate\DisplayName: "Google Update Service"[7]

Impact

A system infected with Dyre banking malware will attempt to harvest credentials for online services, including banking services.

Solution

Users and administrators are recommended to take the following preventive measures to protect their computer networks from phishing campaigns:

US-CERT collects phishing email messages and website locations so that we can help people avoid becoming victims of phishing scams.

You can report phishing to us by sending email to phishing-report@us-cert.gov.

References

Revision History

  • October 27, 2014: Initial Release
  • October 28, 2014: Added Reference 7 in Description Section

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


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