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Geek News Central
  Updated Fri, 24 Jun 2016 19:49:12 +0000
Description Geek News: Latest Technology, Product Reviews, Gadgets and Tech Podcast News for Geeks
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GNC #1125 Roku comes to Windows 10 - Geek News Central
Category Podcast
Published:
Description: Big announcement today Roku comes to Windows 10, Laptops and Tablets can now run Roku and all associated channels.. This is huge you no longer need a dedicated Roku device and can use your own device. I have a ton of tech news along with some weird content for your entertainment value. Download the Audio … Continue reading GNC #1125 Roku comes to Windows 10   more...

Big announcement today Roku comes to Windows 10, Laptops and Tablets can now run Roku and all associated channels.. This is huge you no longer need a dedicated Roku device and can use your own device. I have a ton of tech news along with some weird content for your entertainment value.

Download the Audio Show File

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Show Links:
Independence Day.
YouTube Live for iOS.
FBI can hack your Computer without Warrant.
Will your self driving car kill you?
Uber Pricing.
Power of Live Streaming.
CG for Car Commercials.
Drone Radar.
Roku for Windows 10.
Cover your Laptop Camera with Tape?
Clinton had Firewalls turned off?
NASA on Apple TV.
Sandisk iPhone Memory Expansion Case.
TP Link Smart Plug.
YouTube buys Script.
Incompetence gets woman killed.
Apple Thunderbolt Display Discontinued.
Kodi lives on Rasberry Pi.
Nirvana.
Rob – Brag – Jail.
Google Acquires Fiber.
California Legislature wakes up.
Si2 in Spain.
Neptune Storms.
Bear versus Mountain Bike.
One Eye Blindness.
Get your teeth fixed come out sounding like a Brit.
MIB seen in Iowa.
Six Inch Alien on Mars. (For Real)

Venturer BravoWin Hybrid Notebook Review - Geek News Central
Category Microsoft, review, tablet, Windows, hybrid, notebook, Tablet, Venturer, Windows 10
Published:
Description: Microsoft and small Windows devices are in a difficult space. There’s no doubt that for serious work, a full desktop or laptop is needed, whether based on an Apple or Microsoft OS. When it comes to tablets and phones, Windows is away in the distance behind iOS and Android. Into this place comes the Venturer … Continue reading Venturer BravoWin Hybrid Notebook Review   more...

Venturer LogoMicrosoft and small Windows devices are in a difficult space. There’s no doubt that for serious work, a full desktop or laptop is needed, whether based on an Apple or Microsoft OS. When it comes to tablets and phones, Windows is away in the distance behind iOS and Android.

Into this place comes the Venturer 2-in-1 Mini Windows Notebooks, consisting of the BravoWin 10KT at GB£149 and the EliteWin 11KT at £199. These are hybrid devices, capable of switching between tablet and notebook mode by detaching the keyboard. The main difference between the two models is the screen size (10.1″ 1280×800 v. 11.6″ 1366×768) and here we have the little brother, the BravoWin. I’d never heard of Venturer before but they’re a Hong Kong-based outfit so let’s take a look.

BravoWin Tablet

As a hybrid, the BravoWin comes in two pieces, namely the screen and the keyboard, which come together by slotting the screen into a hinge on the keyboard. The overall dimensions are roughly 26.6 cm by 16.8 cm by 2.4 cm when closed up with a bit of an air gap between the keyboard and screen, though it tapers towards the front. The tablet itself is 1 cm thick.

Opening the BravoWin as a notebook, the hinge rotates downwards to raise the rear of the keyboard up for a slight slope. A soft felt pad along the hinge protects the surface and while the keys on the keyboard are quite small, they do travel nicely. There’s a small button-less touchpad at the front too where double tapping on the left and right side of the keyboard simulates the mouse buttons.

BravoWin Hybrid Tablet

While beauty might be in the eye of the beholder, the BravoWin is no looker. It’s two tone plastic, part dark gray, part silver with buttons, speaker grilles and ports all over the place. Well, not quite everywhere; most are located on one end of the tablet. There’s an HDMI mini, micro SD slot, DC power in, micro USB port, 3.5mm earphone, power on/off button, USB 2 port and Windows button. The BravoWin can be charged both via the micro USB and the DC power in, with a PSU supplied in the box. On the back of the tablet, there’s volume up / down controls and reset button. There’s nothing on the keyboard which is a pity as an extra USB port or two would have been handy.

Edge of BravoWin

In terms of build quality, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. The keyboard and keyboard hinge seem quite sturdy. The tablet itself is plastic and it creaks a little in use. It’s not flimsy but it’s not tremendously reassuring either. Having said that, the promotional material extols the BravoWin’s drop resistance, claiming that it’ll survive a drop from 1.2 m. I didn’t test this…..

BravoWin Hinge

The 10.1″ 1280×800 screen is perfectly acceptable and possibly quite a bit better than some I’ve seen recently. It does suffer a little from backlight bleeding around some of the edges, but it’s most noticeable around the hinge when the notebook is booting and the screen is black. It’s not something I’d worry about in day-to-day use, though. In terms of touch, I found the screen responsive and at times, I ended up using the touchscreen more than the touchpad.

The processor is an Intel Atom Z3735F quad-core clocked at 1.3 GHz (boosts to 1.8 GHz) with 2 GB RAM and 32 GB (28 GB reported) of storage and there’s around 16 GB of space free so the micro SD slot is going to come in useful – it will take cards up to 64 GB. Windows 10 Home is installed, though it’s only the 32bit version despite the 64-bit processor. There’s 11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth too.

Performance is perfectly adequate for what you might call undemanding tasks – surfing the web, watching YouTube, playing Cut The Rope – and you can have a few apps open before switching apps slows it down. Obviously this depends on the apps you are using and the BravoWin is no Surface Pro 4, so adjust expectations accordingly. Regardless, I found it very usable. Battery life is rated at 8 hours and I got over six hours one day without completely exhausting the battery.

BravoWin Back

The 2 MP cameras are a bit disappointing (tablet cameras usually are) and I couldn’t get the front-facing camera to work in the standard Camera app – the app kept crashing. It did work fine in Skype so it’s not a hardware problem in itself. Cortana wasn’t very happy with the microphone either, complaining about low volume. The microphone is positioned on the end of the tablet along with the ports and wasn’t very good at picking up sound unless you were quite close to the mic.

My biggest problem though was with the keyboard and touchpad, and while this sounds like a break-up letter, the problem was me. I’m a man with big hands and I really did not get on with this keyboard. Technically it worked fine but I was constantly pressing the wrong keys, hitting the touchpad when I didn’t mean to and so on. Probably a better choice for children or people with smaller hands than mine.

The BravoWin is the first tablet I’ve used with Windows 10 and it’s certainly much better than its OS predecessors. I still get frustrated at the hybrid nature of Windows 10 at times, with it seemly unable to decide whether it’s a desktop or tablet operating system. Still, this is hardly the fault of the BravoWin so we’ll move on.

Coming to the end of the review, it’s difficult to place the Venturer BravoWin in the marketplace. It’s competing both against Windows laptops and notebooks, and against Android and Apple tablets. It’s not easy to pigeonhole the BravoWin and identify the best use cases, though the obvious ones are people who need Windows on a device strong enough to throw in a bag without worrying. Sounds like a student to me.

Let’s state this plainly: the BravoWin is a cheap small robust hybrid notebook running Microsoft Windows 10. If that’s what you need and you don’t have much cash, then take a look as it fits the bill nicely. People with large hands might want to check out the bigger EliteWin.

Both the BravoWin and the EliteWin are available from Amazon and other good retailers with an RRP of GB£149 and £199 respectively.

Thanks to Venturer for the loan of the BravoWin and if you like the wallpaper, check out Smashing Magazine’s monthly selection.

GNC #1124 Enhanced Content - Geek News Central
Category Podcast
Published:
Description: It’s time to start providing some enhanced content, you are going to as what the heck that means? Well it is time to broaden the shows horizon a little bit and explore some content that I have always loved, but have not covered in the past. Details are in the show and I hope all … Continue reading GNC #1124 Enhanced Content   more...

It’s time to start providing some enhanced content, you are going to as what the heck that means? Well it is time to broaden the shows horizon a little bit and explore some content that I have always loved, but have not covered in the past. Details are in the show and I hope all of you will help me come up with some regular news sources where you go to find the wacky and weird

Download the Audio Show File

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Show Links:
New Google Two Step Authentication.
Bitcoin Patent Machine.
Telia kills the Internet.
DMCA take downs increasing.
Artist want DMCA changes.
Netflix picking a fight.
Alien Series gets a boost.
Solar Impulse on way to Spain.
GotoMyPC Hacked.
Zika Vaccine.
Intel Xeon Phi.
Blue Origin.
Viking 1 1976 Mars Mission.
GOT #1.
GOT #2.
Ticket Bots Illegal in NY.
4th Amendment getting carved up.
Brain industry Shame?
Crazy iPhone Scam.
Spotify Great but holding Growth.
ACER Security Breach.
iPhone 7 Dual Sim Cards?
The Google Doctor is in.
Twitch goes after Bots.
Prime in July.
Netflix Earnings.
Finding Dory Records.
Single Molecule.
China beats Big Blue.
BitTorrent News Network.
New Segway.
Idiots.
Plague Doctor.
Earthquake Sickness.
Giants at Giza.
Missing some Digits.

Losing The Signal - Geek News Central
Category Android, Apple, audible, blackberry, smartphone, audiobook, Blackberry
Published:
Description: We often end up thinking we know the stories behind major and/or tumultuous events that happen during our own lifetimes. One of those revolves around the story of Blackberry. The rise of the iPhone is often thought of as the big downfall of Blackberry, the once wildly popular Canadian phone manufacturer from Waterloo, Ontario. Indeed, … Continue reading Losing The Signal   more...

Losing The SignalWe often end up thinking we know the stories behind major and/or tumultuous events that happen during our own lifetimes. One of those revolves around the story of Blackberry. The rise of the iPhone is often thought of as the big downfall of Blackberry, the once wildly popular Canadian phone manufacturer from Waterloo, Ontario. Indeed, the iPhone was involved in Blackberry’s problems, but not in the way people commonly think it was.

I recently listened to the unabridged version of the Audible audiobook “Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry” written by Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff. The book tells the story of the seemingly overnight rise of the popularity of Blackberry devices, and recounts the often fascinating step by step details of its spectacular fall into relative smartphone obscurity.

For example, were you aware that Blackberry had two CEO’s? Not one, but two. This highly unusual two CEO arrangement may have served Blackberry well at certain times in the beginning, each CEO having his own respective strengths, but in the end it is generally agreed that this odd two CEO arrangement caused inevitable confusion and dangerous, very damaging paralysis as their personal relationship with each other dangerously deteriorated.

I take from this book that Blackberry happened to come along with the right thing at the right time – a device that could reliably and securely put email in the smartphone user’s pockets on early networks. Blackberry was driven to success by sheer market demand for their product, in spite of their missteps. Blackberry’s success was due in part to the fact that because of the way its system was constructed, it could reliably and securely handle email on highly bandwidth-starved networks. Its popularity started as a business device, and ended up with major consumer crossover demand.

A better idea came along – Steve Job’s iPhone. The iPhone essentially put an entire shrunken computer in the user’s pocket, and started a revolution that changed the face of the market itself. Even so, the iPhone didn’t inflict the most damage on Blackberry, but rather the iPhone concept.

The iPhone reached about 25% overall market penetration in developed markets when at the same time Blackberry was able to sell its less-expensive units into price-sensitive world markets that could not afford the high price of the iPhone. In essence, Blackberry was able to keep going even after the iPhone’s obvious success by replicating its early developed-market successes elsewhere in the world.

What inflicted the most damage on Blackberry sales was the incredible spreading dominance and popularity of Android, which could sell cheaper Android-based smartphones into Blackberry’s price-sensitive world markets, thus ultimately rendering Blackberry irrelevant.

Along the way, Blackberry made a couple of serious, self-inflicted missteps with Verizon that it never recovered from. Blackberry, which had been known at one time for rock-solid hardware, realizing it was losing market share, foolishly started selling faulty products into the marketplace that clearly weren’t fully developed and were highly unreliable.

If you enjoy these kinds of non-fiction books that tell behind-the-scenes stories of things that happened in your lifetime, I highly recommend you give this book a try.

LIFX Color 1000 Smart Bulb Review - Geek News Central
Category Home Automation, review, wifi, home automation, LIFX, lighting, smart home
Published:
Description: If you are looking for a last minute Fathers’ Day present then an LIFX smart bulb might be just the thing. Getting into smart lighting can be expensive as there’s often an additional wireless hub to control the lights but LIFX have taken a different approach with their lamps as each one connects via WiFi. … Continue reading LIFX Color 1000 Smart Bulb Review   more...

If you are looking for a last minute Fathers’ Day present then an LIFX smart bulb might be just the thing. Getting into smart lighting can be expensive as there’s often an additional wireless hub to control the lights but LIFX have taken a different approach with their lamps as each one connects via WiFi. There’s no Z-Wave or Zigbee here. The folks at LIFX kindly sent one of their smart bulbs for review, so let’s take a look.

LIFX offer four different bulbs, in a combination of two shapes and colour v white only. On review here is the Color 1000 in the A19 size (BR30 is the other size) in a UK variant with bayonet cap. A screw cap is also available and interestingly works across US and UK voltages.

LIFX Color 1000 in box LIFX Color 1000 in box

In the box, there’s the light plus instructions. In addition to the physical light, an app needs to be downloaded from the appropriate app store to your smartphone or tablet. Apps are available for Android, iOS and Windows.

The bulb itself is solid, weighing in at 243 g and measuring 117 mm tall and 63 mm wide. It’s no lightweight.

LIFX Color 1000 LIFX Color 1000

In common with most “IoT” Wi-Fi devices, there’s a two step setup process that the app takes you through. When first powered up, the light will create a small Wi-Fi network that your smartphone connects to. Using the app, you can then configure the bulb to connect to your home’s Wi-Fi, selecting the SSID and providing the passcode. Both the smartphone and bulb disconnect and reconnect as normal to the Wi-Fi network. With the configuration out of the way, you can now start to have fun.

During the setup, you need to create a username and password which you generally don’t need to use unless you are going to use the bulb with other smart home gear, such as Samsung’s SmartThings. More on this later.

As an aside, during my setup, the bulb needed a quick firmware update which all happened automatically and painlessly, though it did delay getting going by a few moments. Good to see that it’s easy to keep the bulbs up-to-date.

The LIFX app provides all the tools you might expect to manage bulbs in a smartly-lit house. Bulbs can be collected into names spaces, such as “bedroom” providing quick access to multiple bulbs based on location. Obviously in this example I only had one room.

Screenshot_20160609-001949 LIFX Colour Wheel LIFX White Wheel

The bulb can be switched between colour and white modes depending on you mood, with a straightforward wheel to choose the desired hue. The brightness can be controlled too using the control in the middle of the wheel.

LIFX White LIFX RedLIFX Greeen

LIFX say that the Color 1000 puts out a little over 1000 lumens which is equivalent to a 75 W incandescent bulb. It was definitely a bit brighter than my Philips Hue colour bulbs, though I did notice that the Color 1000 got fairly warm too and will consume 11 W at full brightness.

Fiddling around with the LIFX Color 1000 is tremendous fun and children will love co-ordinating with their favourite Disney colours. You can imagine the colours generated from Frozen…. There’s even a special effects mode which has selections like “Spooky”, “Flicker” and “Color Cycle”. Themes sets up preset colours for easy access and schedules can turn lights on and off automatically it’s all simple to use.

Contrary to my original review, the Color 1000 can be controlled from outside out of the premises. Using my mobile phone and 3G only, it worked as if I was at home, turning the light on and off, changing colours and so on. Great if you want to use the LIFX as a security light and turn it on when you are unexpectedly late coming home.(I’m not sure what went wrong the first time I tested and it didn’t work, but I can only assume it was a temporary connectivity problem from outside my home. It definitely does work – sorry LIFX.)

In addition to being able to control the bulb via the native app, LIFX have put some work into integration with connectivity from Nest, IFTTT, “Ok Google”, SmartThings, Echo and Logitech’s Harmony. I tried it with Samsung’s SmartThings and it was very easy and straightforwad. Select LIFX lights in SmartThings, stick in the username and password created during setup, and job done with the Color 1000 appearing in SmartThings for control.

In summary, the LIFX Color 1000 is a good choice if you want to get into smart lighting at a reasonable cost – the UK price of the bulb is £59.99. Admittedly that’s still not cheap and it is £10 dearer than the equivalent Philips Hue but you don’t have to buy the Hue Hub at £50 before you get going. LIFX have future-proofed the investment with their integrations, so if you get into smart lighting and then smart homes, the LIFX Color 1000 can still be used as part of the system. The Color 1000 is a big bulb so if there’s a particular lamp that you want to use with it, just check the bulb’s going to fit.

The LIFX is available from Amazon and other online retailers. Thanks to LIFX for the Color 1000 to review.

GNC #1123 DNC Hacked Big Time - Geek News Central
Category Podcast
Published:
Description: DNC Hacked – Hard to believe that one of the most powerful political groups in America had their servers hacked by Russians.. Shows you they should have spend a little more time locking things down. Big gift to the RNC that is for sure.. Lot’s to share tonight way beyond the DNC hack. I also … Continue reading GNC #1123 DNC Hacked Big Time   more...

DNC Hacked – Hard to believe that one of the most powerful political groups in America had their servers hacked by Russians.. Shows you they should have spend a little more time locking things down. Big gift to the RNC that is for sure.. Lot’s to share tonight way beyond the DNC hack. I also share some news that I am not sure I did after coming back from Michigan.

Download the Audio Show File

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
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Show Links:
DNC Hack.
ISIS Hacker Convicted.
411 Million Faces.
Google and GoDaddy.
No more Free Pizza.
More Free data.
LIGO makes more Discoveries.
We have a new Moon.
Juno inbound to Jupiter.
Review Unit Versus Consumer Products.
Alexa.
Makita Robot.
Dell Dock.
Tablet Update.
Rocket Firing.
Kill or Update Flash.
Opera Mobile Update.
Eero.
Deal of the Day for Dad.
Big Blue Bus.
Crazy Pole Stunts.
Hacking the Hackers.
Visa Speeds up Chip Approvals.
Prisoner Free Speech.
VR and Lucasfilms.
Kyoto Train Musem.
Changes to Help Desk.
Chattanooga  Saved by HS Internet.
Porn Bots.
Microsoft Working to track Weed.
Zika Update.
#1 Idiot!
Git ride of the Cable Modem Bill.
Twitter Video.
Now on Tap Updates.
Big DMCA Win.
Luma.
Pokemon and iPhone.

An Unplanned Upgrade - Geek News Central
Category Samsung, smartphone, sprint, storage, galaxy, Note 5
Published:
Description: A few weeks ago my trusty Samsung Galaxy Note 4 started acting weird, randomly rebooting at inopportune times. To make a long story short, on the second trip to a Sprint store the technicians determined that it was a hardware problem. Since Sprint has no more Note 4 units available for replacements, their only alternative was … Continue reading An Unplanned Upgrade   more...

Note 5A few weeks ago my trusty Samsung Galaxy Note 4 started acting weird, randomly rebooting at inopportune times. To make a long story short, on the second trip to a Sprint store the technicians determined that it was a hardware problem.

Since Sprint has no more Note 4 units available for replacements, their only alternative was to upgrade me to a Note 5. Ever since the Note 5 was announced, I didn’t want it. The Note 5 has no removable battery, and no Micro SD card slot. My plan was to keep the Note 4 and skip to the generation after the Note 5 that should be released sometime towards the fall of this year.

The free upgrade to the Note 5 does not affect the plan I’m on – I can still upgrade to the new Note (6 or 7, depending on what Samsung decides to call it) when it comes out. I was stuck, so I took the free upgrade.

Even though I was somewhat prejudiced against the Note 5, I have to say I’ve been quite impressed with it. The upgrade in overall performance and the snappy feeling of the device is tremendous. The other thing I’ve been amazed with is excellent battery life, which happens in spite of the improved performance over the Note 4.

The overall size of the Note 5 is physically smaller than its predecessor, yet it retains the 5.7” inch screen size. Samsung was able to achieve this by shrinking the bezels even further, particularly on the sides.

For some time now I’ve been using my phones to scan documents for work. I started doing this with a Galaxy S3. The process was faster with the Note 4. It flies with the Note 5.
My bank recently sent me a new chipped debit card, so I had to go through the process of logging in to various services to update my information. To my surprise, I was able to efficiently do all of this updating via the Note 5, mostly due to its speed and responsiveness.

Are there things a mobile device can’t do? Of course. For one thing, a 5.7” inch screen is too small for many tasks. Could I type out an article or record and upload a podcast on the Note 5? Yes, but the mobile form factor just doesn’t work well for these sorts of tasks – they cry out for a real computer in order to be carried out quickly and efficiently.

Smartphones have matured, yet there remains room for improvement. In my opinion, improved performance and improved battery life are the two biggest things that will induce me to consider upgrading to a new phone. Improved camera performance is always a nice thing to have, but camera performance alone won’t induce me to pull the upgrade trigger.

Styling and silly emotional gimmicks have diminishing appeal in a mature market.

Dell Thunderbolt Dock TB15 Review - Geek News Central
Category review
Published:
Description: When Dell sent me the XPS 12 2 in 1 they also included a variety of accessories, one of those was their brand new Dell Thunderbolt Dock Model TB15 which turns out to be one of the most versatile docks I have tested, not to mention lightning fast supporting data transfer speeds up to 40gbps … Continue reading Dell Thunderbolt Dock TB15 Review   more...

tb15When Dell sent me the XPS 12 2 in 1 they also included a variety of accessories, one of those was their brand new Dell Thunderbolt Dock Model TB15 which turns out to be one of the most versatile docks I have tested, not to mention lightning fast supporting data transfer speeds up to 40gbps through the Thunderbolt 3 inner connects.

When the dock is paired with the Dell XPS 12 2 in 1 LaptopDell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD 4k – UP3216Q Monitor & Fusion Thunderbolt 3 PCIe Flash Drive the dock turns the portable XPS 12 2 in 1  into a powerful desktop business solution . After being out of the office all day, all I needed to do was plug the Thunderbolt 3 cable from the dock into the Dell XPS 12, and instantly the monitor and hard drive sync’d up and became available for use. While at the same time charging the XPS 12 via the docks separate power supply.

Through a single Thunderbolt 3 connector between the XPS 12 and the TB15 dock. My interconnections expanded dramatically! The TB15 allows a combination of monitor connections whether it be a standard VGA, Thunderbolt, Mini DisplayPort, DisplayPort or HDMI connection. Three USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0, plus an additional Thunderbolt 3 Port (for external hard drive or other peripheral), GB Lan Connector with Pass-through MAC Address, and Headphone / Mic port. This new dock by Dell is a winner across the board.

fusionThe provided Sonnet Fusion Thunderbolt 3 PCIe Flash drive was the fastest drive I have ever used! With transfer speeds up to 2100 mb/s. I was able to offload 4k drone video files from a Micro SD card via USB 3 to the external Thunderbolt drive and then edit with no lag whatsoever. In the past I would have had to have worked on the video on the internal drive of the laptop.  With the drive being Bus powered no exta cables to worry about, small and rugged this drive will go anywhere.

As reviewed this package from dell is simply incredible. Today the Dell Thunderbolt Dock Model TB15 is currently sold out at dell but should be in stock shortly.

For Purchase Information:
Dell XPS 12 2 in 1
Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD 4k – UP3216Q
Sonnet Fusion Thunderbolt 3 PCIe Flash drive

Dell has provides all items in this review for review. All products have been used in real world conditions and office environment for the past six weeks.

 

GNC #1122 WWDC Anouncements + Trolls Win - Geek News Central
Category Podcast
Published:
Description: I spend time today talking about the LinkedIn Acquisition and its business impact. I also cover in depth the WWDC announcements and the changes coming to the MacOS / iOS. I also cover the new Patent Troll ruling and the impact to businesses. Back in the battle rhythm here. Download the Audio Show File Show … Continue reading GNC #1122 WWDC Anouncements + Trolls Win   more...

I spend time today talking about the LinkedIn Acquisition and its business impact. I also cover in depth the WWDC announcements and the changes coming to the MacOS / iOS. I also cover the new Patent Troll ruling and the impact to businesses. Back in the battle rhythm here.

Download the Audio Show File

Support my Show Sponsor:
30% off on New GoDaddy Orders cjcgnc30
$.99 for a New or Transfered .com cjcgnc99 @ GoDaddy.com
$1.00 / mo Economy Hosting with a free domain. Promo Code: cjcgnc1hs
$1.00 / mo Business Website Builder with free domain. Promo Code: cjcgncgot
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Show Links:
LinkedIn.
Patent Troll.
Confession of a Patent Troll.
Mars Red Dragon.
IRS Transcript Tool.
Cable Companies Crying about Cable Boxes.
3 Million Photo – Time Lapse.
Print me up a Kidney.
FCC denies FOIA.
MacOS Updates.
Apple TV Updates.
Apple’s new File System.
Humor on WWDC Stage.
Apple Numbers.
13 Major Announcements by Apple.
Sling TV to Apple TV Today.
Delete default iOS Apps.
iOS 10 EOL for iPhone 4S.
Apple Women at WWDC.
iMessage Anime.
Peter Thiel whole story.
350k Fine to Amazon on Hazardous Material Shipping.
Blocking Improved on Twitter.
Programming Genius becomes Idiot.
Fantasy Sports Sites Merging?
HBO leaking Game of Thrones?
Alienware and Steam.
Build your own Xbox One Controller.
Samsung PC has Security Issue.

Facebook Will Allow Videos in Comments - Geek News Central
Category Facebook, Facebook Video in Comments
Published:
Description: Facebook is rolling out a new feature that will allow you to upload a video into comments and replies on posts. Apparently, the ability to respond to something with a link, photo, sticker, emoji, or a well written comment wasn’t enough. Soon, the post you make about … anything at all… could end up with … Continue reading Facebook Will Allow Videos in Comments   more...

facebook-logoFacebook is rolling out a new feature that will allow you to upload a video into comments and replies on posts. Apparently, the ability to respond to something with a link, photo, sticker, emoji, or a well written comment wasn’t enough. Soon, the post you make about … anything at all… could end up with a bunch of videos posted as comments.

Bob Baldwin, who works for Facebook and who has been involved in many Facebook Hackathons, is among the people to thank (or grumble at) for this. He points out that the ability to upload a video into comments and replies on posts was something he and others prototyped at Facebook’s 50th Hackathon (which took place earlier this year). That particular Hackathon was called the “Global Jubilee”, and had all Facebook engineering offices hack together.

The “Videos in Comments” ability is being rolled out worldwide. Those who are interested in, or amused by, this option can upload videos as replies to posts made by people and by pages, and also within groups and events. It is supported on desktop web, iOS, and Android.

Judging from the comment section on the Facebook post about “Videos in Comments”, it appears the feature is intended to be used by people who want to make short video posts of themselves expressing a particular emotion or sharing something – and to use that video as a response to someone’s post. To show how this works, Bob Baldwin added a short video of himself as a comment to a post he made. The video briefly showed people around Facebook’s new Seattle office.

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